LostChristchurch

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Name Lost Christchurch
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Last Login 26/04/2013

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Lost Christchurch

Remembering Our Lost Heritage

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A Contents Insurance NZ Policy

A Contents Insurance NZ Policy

Tuesday, 31 January 2017 4:45 p.m. by LostChristchurch

Contents Insurance NZ Policy The process of keeping a home protected throughout a major storm can be challenging because strong winds can damage a house’s structure in a variety of ways. If your home in New Zealand is located in …

Car Insurance NZ Costs Low

Car Insurance NZ Costs Low

Tuesday, 17 January 2017 7:00 p.m. by LostChristchurch

Car Insurance NZ Costs Low Car insurance NZ costs usually rise when drivers don’t commute to different destinations in New Zealand safely by carefully surveying the environment. The process of keeping the price of an insurance policy within a reason …

Car Insurance in New Zealand

Car Insurance in New Zealand

Thursday, 22 December 2016 11:56 a.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

Car Insurance in New Zealand If you are looking into getting car insurance in New Zealand, you will want to consider all of the facts before making your decision. For instance, you don’t actually have to purchase car insurance in …

Lost Christchurch

Lost Christchurch

Tuesday, 20 December 2016 1:29 p.m. by LostChristchurch

Welcome to Lost Christchurch!

Christchurch Gardens Their Early History

Christchurch Gardens Their Early History

Sunday, 31 May 2015 9:08 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

The Old and the New [Written for THE SUN.] Sun, Volume II, Issue 563, 29 November 1915, Page 11

Port Lyttelton – from a Correspondent

Port Lyttelton – from a Correspondent

Saturday, 8 November 2014 11:02 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

This land-locked port of Lyttelton – called occasionally Port Cooper and sometimes Port Victoria – is the main, or rather the only, entrance to the Province of Canterbury. The surrounding hills, which are entirely volcanic, vary in height from 2000 ft, to 6000 ft, and bear, on close inspection, very palpable marks of calcination. The port itself is interesting only from the fact of its being the door to the settlement. It is a mean, insignificant little place, inhabited by persons wh ...

Port Lyttelton – ‘a mean, insignificant little place’

Port Lyttelton – ‘a mean, insignificant little place’

Saturday, 8 November 2014 11:02 p.m. by LostChristchurch

This land-locked port of Lyttelton – called occasionally Port Cooper and sometimes Port Victoria – is the main, or rather the only, entrance to the Province of Canterbury. The surrounding hills, which are entirely volcanic, vary in height from 2000 ft, to 6000 ft, and bear, on close inspection, very palpable marks of calcination. The...

The Glenmark – tragedy and a fortune in colonial gold

The Glenmark – tragedy and a fortune in colonial gold

Sunday, 13 July 2014 8:47 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

“The tale of a shipwreck has for most readers a fascination unequalled by any other of the many forms of tragedy which from time to time sweep some unlucky band or section of humanity into eternity, and during last century [19th Century] shipping disasters were all too frequent around our rugged and then little-known coast. But these bygone tragedies on our shores have been chronicled, so that small room for speculation remains when the cold light of Marine Court inquiries have been shed o ...

The Oldest Building in Canterbury

The Oldest Building in Canterbury

Saturday, 7 June 2014 7:03 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

To settle what seems to be a somewhat vexed question, a representative of the Lyttelton Times yesterday made inquiries among a number of the Pilgrims with regard to the authenticity, or otherwise, of the statement that the building now being used as a residence on the South Belt, near the Southern Cross Hotel, was the earliest of the dwellings occupied by the dwellers on the plains. The representative interviewed many persons, and, towards evening, met Mr Edmund Smart, who resides at No. 55, Cas ...

A Visit to the Suburbs and a Parting Nor’ Wester

A Visit to the Suburbs and a Parting Nor’ Wester

Wednesday, 12 March 2014 10:41 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

The First Car Comes to Christchurch

The First Car Comes to Christchurch

Saturday, 8 March 2014 8:31 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

The Triangle – Noxious Exhalations, a Precocious Wastrel and a Special Earthquake

The Triangle – Noxious Exhalations, a Precocious Wastrel and a Special Earthquake

Wednesday, 15 January 2014 5:49 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

“William Wilson was formerly a cabbage dealer in Canterbury; but fourteen years ago he was poor, whereas now he is rich, a circumstance attributable to a lucky speculation in a piece of land called the Triangles, at Christchurch, which was offered to more than one, previously to being bought for £200 by Wilson, who, unlike the others, had sufficient foresight not to refuse it which now, in rental, brings him in £900 per annum.” Hawke’s Bay Herald, Volume 11, Issue 871, 31 Augus ...

Early Days in Sydenham, how the Pioneers Fared

Early Days in Sydenham, how the Pioneers Fared

Saturday, 14 December 2013 11:22 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

“I REMEMBER.” An interesting contribution to the history of the early days of Christchurch, and especially of the district now known as Sydenham, was made by Mr Henry Ffitch, of Glandovey road, Fendalton, in a series of reminiscences related by him to a “Press” representative. “I remember very well,” said Mr Ffitch, “that part of the country on what is now the borough of Sydenham in the years 1851 and 1852. I have a vivid recollection of the country, in ...

Going Under Canvas at Sumner – 1890s

Going Under Canvas at Sumner – 1890s

Tuesday, 10 December 2013 10:25 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

During the past year or two it has been customary for a number of parties of young men to go into camp at Sumner for the summer months, and to come up to Christchurch during business hours. Special facilities for this purpose having been offered by the Christchurch Tramway Company, the number of camps has considerably increased this year, and at the present time there are some forty parties living under canvas there, comprising over a hundred persons. While some of the parties have been content ...

Shaves & Shampoos on the North West Corner of Cathedral Square

Shaves & Shampoos on the North West Corner of Cathedral Square

Sunday, 22 September 2013 8:59 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

It’s just before 3pm on a late summer day in 1914. Prolific Christchurch photographer, Steffano Webb is setting up his camera equipment inside the gents’ hairdressing saloon of well known Cathedral Square tobacconist, Frederick Woodward, the proprietor of Woodward & Co. The shop has been cleaned top to bottom; the floor swept clean so that not one loose hair can be seen. The mirrors have been polished and a myriad of bottled potions and lotions can be clearly seen on display.

Captain Lorraine’s Final Fatal Balloon Ascent

Captain Lorraine’s Final Fatal Balloon Ascent

Friday, 30 August 2013 7:28 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

Captain Lorriane Loses his Life The Balloon Carried out to Sea A Terrible Fall. The Aeronaut Drowned, Fruitless Search for his Body. Star, Issue 6633, 3 November 1899, Page 4 Not one of the thousand spectators who gathered at Lancaster Park yesterday afternoon to witness the balloon ascent of Captain Lorraine would willingly pass through a period of such awful anxiety and suspense as that which then fell to their lot. It is thrilling and exciting enough, in all conscience, to watch an intrepid a ...

Electric Trams – “Horses No Longer Required”

Electric Trams – “Horses No Longer Required”

Sunday, 25 August 2013 10:24 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

Christchurch was the last of the four cities to introduce electric trams, they had tried to introduce the system in 1902, but it was prior to the amalgamation of the boroughs, so with the advent of greater Christchurch and the Tramway Board being established, the work was able to be begun.

Mrs General Mite – ‘one of the most interesting personalities that has ever visited the Dominion’

Mrs General Mite – ‘one of the most interesting personalities that has ever visited the Dominion’

Saturday, 24 August 2013 11:57 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

It was a warm fair day on the 16th December 1919, a light nor’easterly breeze was blowing through the city. Much the same weather was being experienced throughout the whole of the Dominion.

Millie Mite – ‘one of the most interesting personalities that has ever visited the Dominion’

Millie Mite – ‘one of the most interesting personalities that has ever visited the Dominion’

Saturday, 24 August 2013 11:57 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

It was a warm fair day on the 16th December 1919,  a light nor’easterly breeze was blowing through the city. Much the same weather was being experienced throughout the whole of the Dominion. The country was at the height of election fever. The Press had built a 50ft long by 27ft high results board outside their office so the thousands that were expected to gather in Cathedral Square could see the latest results from every part of New Zealand. For the first time women could be elected into ...

D.I.C. 1909 – ‘An up-to-date Emporium’

D.I.C. 1909 – ‘An up-to-date Emporium’

Sunday, 18 August 2013 10:07 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

From the ashes of the conflagration which ravaged the business heart of the city a year ago, there has arisen a wonderfully spacious and thoroughly up-to-date emporium, designed for the occupation of the extensive business undertakings of the Drapery Importing Company, firmly established in public confidence everywhere under the familiar title of the D.I.C. All the enterprise and modern ideas could suggest for the convenient carrying on of business has been incorporated with the internal arrange ...

D.I.C. 1909 – ‘An up-to-date Emporium’

D.I.C. 1909 – ‘An up-to-date Emporium’

Sunday, 18 August 2013 10:07 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

The New Premises of the D.I.C. Cashel and Lichfield Streets, Christchurch From the ashes of the conflagration which ravaged the business heart of the city a year ago, there has arisen a wonderfully spacious and thoroughly up-to-date emporium, designed for the occupation of the extensive business undertakings of the Drapery Importing Company, firmly established in public confidence everywhere under the familiar title of the D.I.C. All the enterprise and modern ideas could suggest for the convenie ...

D.I.C. Opens for Business in Cashel Street

D.I.C. Opens for Business in Cashel Street

Sunday, 18 August 2013 10:02 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

 

D.I.C. Opens for Business in Cashel Street, 1884

D.I.C. Opens for Business in Cashel Street, 1884

Sunday, 18 August 2013 10:02 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

“…the advent of a new Company that will sell goods at reasonable profits for cash…” To the Editor of the Press. Dear Sir, All undertakings of a public beneficial nature, which are likely to affect the interests of others, are certain to arouse the ire and enmity of those interested, and to call forth letters with a view to injure and vilify such undertakings. In such a position is the assailment by anonymous writers of the new Direct Importing Drapery Company. There are s ...

A Penny Stamp for All Places – Cathedral Square c.1908

A Penny Stamp for All Places – Cathedral Square c.1908

Sunday, 4 August 2013 10:08 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

“There are two classes of Christchurch postcards – those with the Cathedral and those without.” The elegance of a lost age is captured in this exquisite photochrom postcard taken in Cathedral Square. The Edwardian photographer has recorded a moment in time, circa 1908, taken from outside the Christchurch Post and Telegraph Exchange. Women dressed in wide Edwardian hats and dress coats seem to waft through the scene. A gathering of ladies encircle a horse-drawn bus, perhaps bidd ...

Handsome and substantial – Warner’s Hotel, Cathedral Square

Handsome and substantial – Warner’s Hotel, Cathedral Square

Friday, 2 August 2013 3:18 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

On the north east corner of Cathedral Square, the Commercial Hotel, owned by John Etherden Coker (1832 – 1894) was opened in 1863. The name Warner’s was not used until the hotel’s third owner, William Francis Warner (1836 – 1896) purchased the establishment in 1873 and renamed it Warner’s Commercial Hotel. Warner the Hero Warner was one of Christchurch’s most respected members of the licensed victuallers’ fraternity who owned Warner’s Hotel for twe ...

“Letter From New Zealand” …or Provincial Propoganda?

“Letter From New Zealand” …or Provincial Propoganda?

Friday, 26 July 2013 8:27 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

Dear Father and Mother, l arrived here all safe on the 23rd of September, after a splendid voyage of 94 days without a single storm. I enjoyed the voyage very much and was kindly treated by everybody, plenty to do and plenty of friends. I have nothing to say against the Government, for they looked well after the single girls, and we have had the £5 given to us for industry and good conduct on board the ship, so that I am quite free, which is a great thing. I was able to earn by my needle on the ...

“The Sick, Faint Feeling of Violent Shakes,” Jane Deans

“The Sick, Faint Feeling of Violent Shakes,” Jane Deans

Thursday, 25 July 2013 10:06 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

For one of our city’s most famous early women settlers, poor health had marred not only her voyage to New Zealand but also her arrival to her new home at Riccarton. From the moment Jane Deans boarded the sailing ship at Plymouth for Canterbury in November of 1853, she suffered from motion sickness. As the voyage progressed, her sea sickness became so severe, she could neither face hot tea nor food of any kind. Only just married to John Deans in October, Jane was also suffering from morning ...

Rudyard Kipling’s Flying Visit to Christchurch

Rudyard Kipling’s Flying Visit to Christchurch

Thursday, 25 July 2013 8:49 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

By Our Special Reporter Yesterday morning I was at the Christchurch railway station with the intention of going to Port by the five minutes to eight train, in order to meet Mr Rudyard Kipling, who was a passenger on the Talune. I found that the steamer had arrived early in the morning, and that some of her passengers had already come up to town. I made enquiries in what I considered likely quarters, but could not ascertain whether or not Mr Kipling had been among these passengers. My enquiries w ...

The Spanish Beauty and the Beast – The Manchester St Murder

The Spanish Beauty and the Beast – The Manchester St Murder

Saturday, 20 July 2013 1:13 p.m. by LostChristchurch Popular

For £55, reports The Press in 1909, an Antipodean may travel to London and back via the Cape, and secure a very pleasant holiday. “Twopenny tubes and penny buses are to be hailed in preference to taxis, and champagne chicken suppers are not to be on the daily menu, but a traveller could live and do fairly handsomely at a rate of a little over £3 per week.” French aviator and inventor Louis Blériot has, in July 1909, flown the English Channel for the first time in man’s history. ...